Hans de Goede (hansdegoede) wrote,
Hans de Goede
hansdegoede

How to fix Linux EFI secure-boot shim bootloop issue

How to fix the Linux EFI secure-boot shim bootloop issue seen on some systems.

Quite a few Bay- and Cherry-Trail based systems have bad firmware which completely ignores any efibootmgr set boot options. They basically completely reset the boot order doing some sort of auto-detection at boot. Some of these even will given an error about their eMMC not being bootable unless the ESP has a EFI/Microsoft/Boot/bootmgfw.efi file!

Many of these end up booting EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi unconditionally every boot. This will cause a boot loop since when Linux is installed EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi is now shim. When shim is started with a path of EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi, shim will add a new efibootmgr entry pointing to EFI/fedora/shimx64.efi and then reset. The goal of this is so that the firmware's F12 bootmenu can be used to easily switch between Windows and Linux (without chainloading which breaks bitlocker). But since these bad EFI implementations ignore efibootmgr stuff, EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi shim will run again after the reset and we have a loop.

There are 2 ways to fix this loop:

1. The right way: Stop shim from trying to add a bootentry pointing to EFI/fedora/shimx64.efi:

rm EFI/Boot/fbx64.efi
cp EFI/fedora/grubx64.efi EFI/Boot


The first command will stop shim from trying to add a new efibootmgr entry (it calls fbx64.efi to do that for it) instead it will try to execute grubx64.efi from the from which it was executed, so we must put a grubx64.efi in the EFI/Boot dir, which the second command does. Do not use the livecd EFI/Boot/grubx64.efi file for this as I did at first, that searches for its config and env under EFI/Boot which is not what we want.

Note that upgrading shim will restore EFI/Boot/fbx64.efi. To avoid this you may want to backup EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi, then do "sudo rpm -e shim-x64" and then restore the backup.

2. The wrong way: Replace EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi with a copy of EFI/fedora/grubx64.efi

This is how I used to do this until hitting the scenario which caused me to write this blog post. There are 2 problems with this:

2a) This requires disabling secure-boot (which I could live with sofar)
2b) Some firmwares change how they behave, exporting a different DSDT to the OS dependending on if EFI/Boot/bootx64.efi is signed or not (even with secure boot disabled) and their behavior is totally broken when it is not signed. I will post another rant ^W blogpost about this soon. For now lets just say that you should use workaround 1. from above since it simply is a better workaround.

Note for better readability the above text uses bootx64, shimx64, fbx64 and grubx64 throughout. When using a 32 bit EFI (which is typical on Bay Trail systems) you should replace these with bootia32, shimia32, fbia32 and grubia32. Note 32 bit EFI Bay Trail systems should still use a 64 bit Linux distro, the firmware being 32 bit is a weird Windows related thing.

Also note that your system may use another key then F12 to show the firmware's bootmenu.
Tags: fedora, grub, shim
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