Hans de Goede (hansdegoede) wrote,
Hans de Goede
hansdegoede

Soft unbricking Bay- and Cherry-Trail tablets with broken BIOS settings

As you may know I've been doing a lot of hw-enablement work on Bay- and Cherry-Trail tablets as a side-project for the last couple of years.

Some of these tablets have one interesting feature intended to "flash" Android on them. When turned on with both the volume-up and the volume-down buttons pressed at the same time they enter something called DNX mode, which it will then also print to the LCD panel, this is really just a variant of the android fastboot protocol built into the BIOS. Quite a few models support this, although on Bay Trail it sometimes seems to be supported (it gets shown on the screen) but it does not work since many models which only shipped with Windows lack the external device/gadget-mode phy which the Bay Trail SoC needs to be able to work in device/gadget mode (on Cherry Trail the gadget phy has been integrated into the SoC).

So on to the topic of this blog-post, I recently used DNX mode to unbrick a tablet which was dead due to the BIOS settings get corrupted in a way where it would not boot and it was also impossible to enter the BIOS setup. After some duckduckgo-ing I found a thread about how in DNX mode you can upload a replacement for the efilinux.efi bootloader normally used for "fastboot boot" and how you can use this to upload a binary to flash the BIOS. I did not have a BIOS image of this tablet, so that approach did not work for me. But it did point me in the direction of a different, safer (no BIOS flashing involved) solution to unbrick the tablet.

If you run the following 2 commands on a PC with a Bay- or Cherry-Trail connected in DNX mode:

fastboot flash osloader some-efi-binary.efi
fastboot boot some-android-boot.img

Then the tablet will execute the some-efi-binary.efi. At first I tried getting an EFI shell this way, but this failed because the EFI binary gets passed some arguments about where in RAM it can find the some-android-boot.img. Then I tried booting a grubx64.efi file and that result in a grub commandline. But I had not way to interact with it and replacing the USB connection to the PC with a OTG / USB-host cable with a keyboard attached to it did not result in working input.

So my next step was to build a new grubx64.efi with "-c grub.cfg" added to the commandline for the final grub2-mkimage step, embedding a grub.cfg with a single line in there: "fwsetup". This will cause the tablet to reboot into its BIOS setup menu. Note on some tablets you still will not have keyboard input if you just let the tablet sit there while it is rebooting. But during the reboot there is enough time to swap the USB cable for an OTG adapter with a keyboard attached before the reboot completes and then you will have working keyboard input. At this point you can select "load setup defaults" and then "save and exit" and voila the tablet works again.

For your convenience I've uploaded a grubia32.efi and a grubx64.efi with the necessary "fwsetup" grub.cfg here. This is build from this branch at this commit (this was just a random branch which I had checked out while working on this).

Note the image used for the "fastboot boot some-android-boot.img" command does not matter much, but it must be a valid android boot.img format file otherwise fastboot will refuse to try to boot it.
Tags: baytrail, cherrytrail, fedora, grub, unbrick
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